Where Are The Women Artists | A new directory for womxn artists by Art Girl Rising

HERE ARE THE WOMEN ARTISTS!

A new database and directory for ALL female identified artists and art world professionals organized by Art Girl Rising.

We are here, we will be seen. Together, we will rise!⁠ Submissions are now open.⁠ The goal of this project is to increase visibility and opportunities for womxn in the art world and to ensure that museums, galleries and art fairs NO longer exclude or ignore us. #sorrynotsorry 

Our new baby, 'Where Are The Women Artists?' - (or WATWA as we like to call it!) is now LIVE! As with everything, this took much longer than anticipated, but we are so excited to share this with you ♥️⁠

Submission Information

WE WELCOME ARTISTS OF ALL SKILL LEVELS, BACKGROUND, AND NATIONALITY. ⁠

Submit your artwork and bio now for FREE with our pre-launch code:⁠

Login: pxpcontemporary
Password: pxplove

SUBMISSIONS CLOSE 30 NOVEMBER 2020.⁠

To submit, click on the link in our bio! Or similarly, you can go to www.wherearethewomenartists.com

PLEASE NOTE: Official launch + submissions reopen in January 2021 with a small annual fee.

Other articles:

Mansa Musa With Cleopatra & The Black Effect

We're pleased to share this powerful personal essay by artist Kestin Cornwall that gives more insight into his work overall and specifically, to his painting "Mansa Musa With Cleopatra." 

I create art to document change and to ask questions. I try to approach my work as a visual thinker and aim to think critically. Media has often distorted representations of Black and Brown males; how we speak, love, and live. The North American media industry is the largest in the world, and therefore has a huge effect on how the world views minorities, specifically Black and Brown males. This large consumption of media affects the public’s attitudes towards Black and Brown men. These preconceived notions and perceptions of us have directly affected the treatment of Black and Brown men within the justice system. It also affects self-realization and individual development, punitive laws, and police practices that in the end affect and change our communities and how we all interact within them.

While creating the image titled "Mansa Musa With Cleopatra", I wanted to take into account how some will see love and affection in this image, while others will see aggression, consciously or subconsciously, admittingly or not. I wanted to ask questions about love, biases, perceived ideas and views and how the media and history are often written from a eurocentric perspective. This one-sided perspective views Black and Brown, as well as men from other groups, differently and in many ways unjustly, while simultaneously claiming to push equality. It's also selective with who is included in documented mainstream history and who is left out. All this while also underrepresenting specifically Black men but Black people in general as well as other minority groups. Why do we all know who Isaac Newton is but many don't know of Musa al-Khwarizmi or Brahmagupta?

Thinking back to this, I remember growing up, and how my family would be fearful of how the world would see me when I left the house. They would run down a list of things to do and not do in case of an unwarranted interaction with a police officer, fearing that I would be viewed as a threat. My mother grew up in the '60s in Detroit. She has brothers, she's seen the news, she has had racism affect her life in North America, and she knew to warn me based on her past experiences. I remember spending time with my white friends who did not have this fear. White families instructed their kids to demand a badge number by police and had no fear of how police would incorrectly identify and interact with their sons. They felt protected by the police.

The lack of balanced representation and the pre-decided view of Black men and other groups has led to many issues. Tamir Rice was a 12-year old African-American boy. Tamir was shot in Cleveland by Timothy Loehmann, a 26-year-old white police officer. Loehmann shot the 12-year-old boy on site. This is just one example of bad policing with clear biases, and an officer behaving over aggressively, ending in a loss of a very valuable life.

My grandfather paid taxes, was respected, and worked legally in North America. My dad worked his whole life and paid taxes in Canada, sometimes three jobs just to feed us. My other grandfather is the descendent of southern slaves, who built North America, and were abused and neglected by the country they so dearly loved. Even after the government promised in 1865 that those freed would be paid land and provided the ability to work that land, the same tools white Americans had been given for 100’s of years, this was never actually given to Black Americans. If we use the game Monopoly as an example, white America has been playing for days. Black people were forced to stand the whole time at gunpoint in the doorway to this room and just moments ago had the opportunity to sit down and play at the table.

A close friend, who is white, asked me years ago, when we were 24 or so, what I saw for my future by 30. I remember his face when I told him I was expecting to be dead by now. I just want to make it out. Out to me at the time was a better life than what we had there, and opportunity. At the time I was watching what family members in Detroit were experiencing. I was seeing men like me being mistreated. I had been in altercations and been called racial slurs. I was seeing how Canada treated Indigenous people and Black people. My teachers had shown us the video of the Rodney King beating and I’d seen the misrepresentation and disparity in arrest shown on camera on shows like “Cops”. I was targeted by the police as a teenager at a party in high school. I’ve always kept my grades up, I’ve always been respectful, I’ve never wanted to fight unless it was self-defense. But now, having time to analyze some aspects of the past, I realize these interactions and survival mindsets have had an effect not just on me, but on our culture, on our society, on our communities, and on our countries.

I think society is desensitized to Black and Brown pain and death, due to the media bias, including shows like “Cops”. I want to humanize our women and our men while uniquely representing them. There are many types of Blackness. As Black men we love, as Black men we protect our women, we kiss babies, we enjoy the greenery of a garden, we care, we create. As far as numbers, studies show that as Black men, we are more likely to play with our children at home and do homework with our children in our homes. We are powerful, we are strong, some of us are built like Michael B. Jordan and LeBron James. We’re also calm, cerebral, and kind-hearted like John Lewis and Barack Obama. The Black Effect.

-Kestin Cornwall 

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Learn more about the book here.

 

Dessert art by LA based resin sculptor Betsy Enzensberger

Our mission is to have collectors come to know us for our selection of affordable contemporary art! We work hard to curate pieces that are both high-quality and unique. To that end, today we're highlighting one of our favorite artists who creates fun dessert art sculptures that are sure to make a statement in any collection - Betsy Enzsensberger

dessert art Betsy Enzensberger

Dessert Art

Whether you are new to buying contemporary art or a seasoned collector, we know you'll love Betsy's work. Her life-sized sculptures of frozen, melting treats are a conversation piece that, unlike the real thing, lasts forever. You can even contact us if you'd like Betsy to create something custom for you. Treat yourself! 

Dessert Sculptures

Since these pieces are generally around five inches, they are easy to display on a desk, mantle, or shelf. Place it atop a few colorful coffee table books for a chic, modern look. Each dessert art sculpture is unique, signed by the artist, and comes in a special box.

Betsy Enzensberger

Enzensberger sculpts works that create a visceral longing and remembrance of the most nostalgic delights from childhood. The artist uses the familiarity of those sweet treats to help us remember the simplicity, value, and culture of desserts so often associated with positivity and joy. She was born and raised in New York and is now a Los Angeles-based artist. 

Enzensberger has become quite well known for her realistic, larger-than-life sculptures of dripping, frozen treats such as popsicle sculptures. The material resin looks like candy in that it appears delicious and sweet. The shiny exterior has a wet, melting quality. Her Tragically Sweet series plays with the desires of everyone’s inner child. The lure of sweet, sticky popsicles artificially instills intense longing. The colorful confections practically beg to be rescued and consumed.

“Resin - I love it. It’s beautiful, sexy, mysterious. It’s also toxic, messy, and annoyingly exhausting to create. However, I enjoy the challenges that resin presents. There’s just something about it I can’t resist. If the process was easy, I wouldn’t be doing it.” – Betsy Enzensberger

Shop her collection here!

About PxP Contemporary

PxP Contemporary is an online platform that connects collectors with high-quality, affordable artworks. We believe in transparent pricing, building meaningful relationships with our clients, providing exceptional customer service and above all, supporting the talented artists who we work with and represent. CEO & co-founder Alicia Puig and co-founder Ekaterina Popova, with a combined 15+ years of experience working in the arts, launched PxP to challenge the traditional gallery model and make the process of buying art a more accessible, digital-friendly experience. Art lovers, whether looking to add to an already established collection or acquiring their very first piece, can browse our curated selection of art with fixed prices up to $2,500 by contemporary artists from around the globe. 

A Conversation About Art & Current Events with Kestin Cornwall: Art & Cocktails

In this episode, Alicia returns as a guest host to interview Toronto-based figurative painter Kestin Cornwall.

Over the past ten years, Cornwall has focused on creating relevant progressive art. He has used a varied practice of combining hand drawings, digitally removing the human hand and then forcing the element of the human hand back into the work. Using elements such as painting, wheat-pasting, screen-printing, installation and drawing to explore the relationship between art, human rights, politics, sex, and freedom, Cornwall critically charts current political, social, and economic landscapes with compositions brimming with references to media, popular culture, music, and art history.

https://www.kestincornwall.com/
http://www.blackocadu.ca

We discuss:

Steps that the art world should take in order to be more inclusive & diverse
The importance of developing your creative voice as an artist
Tips for developing your style & more advice for emerging artists

www.createmagazine.com/podcast

Abstract face painting on canvas - or something more? The inspiration behind art by Scott Hutchison

Here at PxP Contemporary, we love figurative art, but are always looking for artists who put their own unique spin on this historical genre. To that end, we are thrilled to have Virginia-based painter Scott Hutchison on our roster. His beautifully rendered portraits invite us to contemplate identity while also appreciating the intricacies of the human form in an array of colorful tones. 

Scott Hutchison Art

From Photo Session to Abstract Face Painting On Canvas

"All of my work begins from a photo session with a model. It’s important not to plan or guide the model too much so that the poses and expressions are more natural and honest. After the session is over I digitally collage and experiment by juxtaposing the poses on the computer in a similar manner one would collage with cut paper. I sometimes work on the collages for days; moving various body parts around the screen, combining multiple poses, modifying skin tones, and inserting different models or photo sessions together with the goal of creating something new. The process of collaging on the computer is very experimental and random. However, the painting process is less so. Apart from the usual edits, accidents and discoveries one might have when painting most subjects from life."

Scott Hutchison Art

Artist Statement

My original paintings and drawings are comprised of overlapping figures stitched together in one composition. They are multifaceted, abstracted, and meant to evoke the idea that our identity is in flux. Though we are singular beings, our psyche is not. We are molded in part by time and our life experiences.

The subjects in my paintings personify the strength and frailty of consciousness and the depths to which we experience the human condition. The figures are displaced, out of sync, and stitched together from a multitude of people, like ghosts or layered memories, both timeless and self-aware.

All of my work can be seen as a journal entry, the manifestation of a deep concern for place and purpose in this world. I reassign faces and body parts through a mixture of trial and error, coupled with random chance and the need to create something from nothing. During this process, I am fully aware that I am seeking answers to a larger question: Are we in control of what defines us as individuals, or are we a product of our culture and our experiences? My art is meant to tug at the viewer and suggest that there is more to the material world. Each piece is intentionally shrouded in mystery, letting the viewer interpret its multitude of meanings.

Click to view Scott Hutchison Art.

Scott Hutchison Art

Collecting Affordable Contemporary Art

We started PxP Contemporary to serve two different audiences. First, the collectors who wanted high quality art, but who still wanted to be smart about their spending. Our platform offers a curated selection of affordable contemporary art by talented international artists to satisfy that need and makes the process of buying online simpler and more efficient than going through the same experience with a traditional gallery. 

We also wanted to cater to emerging artists who are looking for better options to sell their work through a trusted gallery. Take a look at our selection of paintings, prints, photography, collage, drawings, sculpture, and more! We're sure you'll find 'art you can afford to love' to add to your collection.