Mansa Musa With Cleopatra & The Black Effect

We're pleased to share this powerful personal essay by artist Kestin Cornwall that gives more insight into his work overall and specifically, to his painting "Mansa Musa With Cleopatra." 

I create art to document change and to ask questions. I try to approach my work as a visual thinker and aim to think critically. Media has often distorted representations of Black and Brown males; how we speak, love, and live. The North American media industry is the largest in the world, and therefore has a huge effect on how the world views minorities, specifically Black and Brown males. This large consumption of media affects the public’s attitudes towards Black and Brown men. These preconceived notions and perceptions of us have directly affected the treatment of Black and Brown men within the justice system. It also affects self-realization and individual development, punitive laws, and police practices that in the end affect and change our communities and how we all interact within them.

While creating the image titled "Mansa Musa With Cleopatra", I wanted to take into account how some will see love and affection in this image, while others will see aggression, consciously or subconsciously, admittingly or not. I wanted to ask questions about love, biases, perceived ideas and views and how the media and history are often written from a eurocentric perspective. This one-sided perspective views Black and Brown, as well as men from other groups, differently and in many ways unjustly, while simultaneously claiming to push equality. It's also selective with who is included in documented mainstream history and who is left out. All this while also underrepresenting specifically Black men but Black people in general as well as other minority groups. Why do we all know who Isaac Newton is but many don't know of Musa al-Khwarizmi or Brahmagupta?

Thinking back to this, I remember growing up, and how my family would be fearful of how the world would see me when I left the house. They would run down a list of things to do and not do in case of an unwarranted interaction with a police officer, fearing that I would be viewed as a threat. My mother grew up in the '60s in Detroit. She has brothers, she's seen the news, she has had racism affect her life in North America, and she knew to warn me based on her past experiences. I remember spending time with my white friends who did not have this fear. White families instructed their kids to demand a badge number by police and had no fear of how police would incorrectly identify and interact with their sons. They felt protected by the police.

The lack of balanced representation and the pre-decided view of Black men and other groups has led to many issues. Tamir Rice was a 12-year old African-American boy. Tamir was shot in Cleveland by Timothy Loehmann, a 26-year-old white police officer. Loehmann shot the 12-year-old boy on site. This is just one example of bad policing with clear biases, and an officer behaving over aggressively, ending in a loss of a very valuable life.

My grandfather paid taxes, was respected, and worked legally in North America. My dad worked his whole life and paid taxes in Canada, sometimes three jobs just to feed us. My other grandfather is the descendent of southern slaves, who built North America, and were abused and neglected by the country they so dearly loved. Even after the government promised in 1865 that those freed would be paid land and provided the ability to work that land, the same tools white Americans had been given for 100’s of years, this was never actually given to Black Americans. If we use the game Monopoly as an example, white America has been playing for days. Black people were forced to stand the whole time at gunpoint in the doorway to this room and just moments ago had the opportunity to sit down and play at the table.

A close friend, who is white, asked me years ago, when we were 24 or so, what I saw for my future by 30. I remember his face when I told him I was expecting to be dead by now. I just want to make it out. Out to me at the time was a better life than what we had there, and opportunity. At the time I was watching what family members in Detroit were experiencing. I was seeing men like me being mistreated. I had been in altercations and been called racial slurs. I was seeing how Canada treated Indigenous people and Black people. My teachers had shown us the video of the Rodney King beating and I’d seen the misrepresentation and disparity in arrest shown on camera on shows like “Cops”. I was targeted by the police as a teenager at a party in high school. I’ve always kept my grades up, I’ve always been respectful, I’ve never wanted to fight unless it was self-defense. But now, having time to analyze some aspects of the past, I realize these interactions and survival mindsets have had an effect not just on me, but on our culture, on our society, on our communities, and on our countries.

I think society is desensitized to Black and Brown pain and death, due to the media bias, including shows like “Cops”. I want to humanize our women and our men while uniquely representing them. There are many types of Blackness. As Black men we love, as Black men we protect our women, we kiss babies, we enjoy the greenery of a garden, we care, we create. As far as numbers, studies show that as Black men, we are more likely to play with our children at home and do homework with our children in our homes. We are powerful, we are strong, some of us are built like Michael B. Jordan and LeBron James. We’re also calm, cerebral, and kind-hearted like John Lewis and Barack Obama. The Black Effect.

-Kestin Cornwall 

Other articles:

PxP Co-founders invited for a live interview with Matrons & Mistresses

Earlier this year, we connected with Lizzie Cheatham McNairy who is the founder of Matrons & Mistresses. M&M is a digital publication which speaks to the power of art to shift one’s perspective and touch one’s heart… a platform which shines light on the incredible women who shape the arts… and a community where there are far more questions than answers and people are encouraged to come as themselves. After hearing about and reading our latest book The Complete Smartist Guide, she was kind enough to invite us to do a live talk and interview with her about it. We’re so excited to have the opportunity to chat about this book together, which we have not done since it launched back in August!

If you’d like to join us next Thursday, July 15th at 7pm EST, please register for free here. Thanks and we look forward to connecting with you!

-Alicia (& Kat)

Alicia Puig honored with Latina Leaders Award 2020-2021

Alicia was one of 12 recipients of the Latina Leaders Awards 2020-2021 given by Latinasinbusiness.us

Learn more about the award, the other honorees, and the ceremony that occurred on June 10th to celebrate the winners. 

PxP Contemporary featured in Divide Magazine

Alicia was interviewed about the gallery in the second issue of Divide Magazine, an independent contemporary arts publication.

Pictured artwork by Betsy Enzensberger.

The Ultimate Guide to Writing a Professional Artist Resume

Artist Resume Template

If 7 seconds is the average amount of time someone will spend looking at your resume before deciding to move further with your application, you need to get it right.

Make your first impression count!

I absolutely understand the frustration of not knowing what to include in your artist resume or how it should be organized. I used to spend hours overanalyzing and re-editing or rush to craft and polish a resume before an application was due! Now you can avoid all of that unnecessary stress with my easy-to-use professional artist resume template.

All of the research and formatting is already done for you so there’s no more confusing guesswork involved on your end. It is available as an immediate download that you can fully customize by filling in your personal information.

This annotated Word document comes ready for you to plug and play, and it even includes extra notes from me as well as ten additional professional tips I’ve learned from my experience. The tailored versions of my master resume have gotten me jobs and internships, awards, exhibitions, a book deal, and much more.

What will yours do for you?

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Curator's Picks of Faces & Figures II!

Thanks to Ziquita Riberdy of Divide Magazine for selecting our next round of Curator's Picks from our current exhibition "Faces & Figures II". Learn more about the reasoning behind the selections below. Both artworks are available to purchase, simply visit the gallery artists page to browse by artist, search in our navigation menu, or check out the exhibition page. 

 Hannah Debson

"This piece is a direct reflection on the connection between art and fashion.
Photographers are sometimes forced to pick between art or editorial style photographs when in reality, the two can merge and function cohesively. There is a want for editorial style photographs to transition into gallery exhibitions and the contemporary art world."

Elisa Valenti Body Positive Art

"There is an "ideal body" that is portrayed in most of the world. Even in figurative
drawing, most models have a slimmer physique. Unfortunately, the "ideal body" only represents a fraction of the population. It's a breath of fresh air to see a realistic portrayal of a woman's figure that others may relate to."

PxP Contemporary's Second Curation with SHOWFIELDS

Alicia was invited to curate a second collection for SHOWFIELDS in February. She selected works by nine artists around the themes of human connection and the environment. 

View the collection

Curatorial Statement:

After spending most of 2020 indoors within the confines of our homes, we feel a collective longing for both nature and connection. These are two themes that are inherently a part of the artists’ works that I’ve selected for this curation. Some present the human form intertwined with or immersed in a landscape or other natural environment, while others compose images with figures alongside animals, flowers, and insects. Working in the mediums of collage and painting, these artists remind us to appreciate the profound beauty of our surroundings and of the importance of having respect for it now and in the years to come. 

These works of art also act as a record and documentation of life as an artist during the pandemic. While they, like everyone else, experienced loss, grief, anxiety, frustration, and fear - like nature itself, they also went through periods of growth and renewal. For me, bringing together this collection of artists is a manifestation of the belief that 2021 will indeed allow for more opportunities to connect with the environment, ourselves, and each other. It’s a sigh of relief, or rather, a breath of fresh air.

Featured Artists:

Austin Howlett
Emily Mullet
Erin McGean
Heather Polk
Kestin Cornwall
Mia Risberg
Shachi Kale
Sophia Tristan
Twiggy Boyer

Shop available artwork directly on the SHOWFIELDS website